Archive for the ‘crime’ Category

It’s all down to who you trust. Aiden O’Hara has been head of the family since he was kid, and he’s going to keep it that way. Jade Dixon is the one who watches his back. Mother of his son. The one who makes him invincible. But Jade’s been in the game a lot longer than Aiden. She knows no one’s indestructible. And when you’re at the top, that’s when you’ve got to watch the hardest. Especially the ones closest to you…

Headine

Supplied by Hachette New Zealand

Reviewed by Jan

Reeva O’Hara is a fighter, pregnant at 14, she went on to have 4 more, all with different dads.  While she’s had a tough life, she loves her kids and they adore her.

Aiden O’Hara is the eldest and knows Reeva is a naive mess who attracts the wrong sort of men.   He steps up to look after the family and rises quickly in the London criminal underworld.

Jade Dixon is his lover, mother of his son, the only person he listens to.  In the underworld for much longer than Aiden, she knows no one is untouchable.

Aiden is a psychopath with no conscience though, and those closest to him know it.

This book is part of the successful formula of Martina Cole and enjoyable, though not her best work.  It kept me turning pages and the end was shocking to me as I didn’t see it coming.

A fun read.

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Speaking in Bones

There is Kathy Reichs, herself a distinguished forensic anthropologist; there is the Bones of the TV series; and somewhere in between those extremes is the Bones of the novels. Speaking in Bones is an incredibly realistic novel with a sense of authenticity that is rarely found in detective fiction. It’s also very complex – there’s a lot going on, and the plot twists and turns as Bones works to figure out who did it – if indeed, they did it at all!

It begins with an amateur web sleuth connects a unreported missing person to an unidentified partial skeleton that Bones has previously examined, and finds a mysterious recording on a up in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Which are part of the Appalachians, notorious as the home of weirdos and wacked-out religious sects, which as you may safely determine from the title are deeply involved in the plot of this mystery. No doubt that will offend some people, but…

I found this an intriguing and well-plotted mystery – Kathy Reichs writes about what she knows, and writes very well. It might not be science fiction, but it is very definitely fiction about real science.

Heinemann

Supplied by Penguin Random House New Zealand

Reviewed by Jacqui

five minutes alone

Theodore Tate is one of the ‘Coma Cops’ shot by a vicious psychopath six months ago. He has returned to the police force and is assigned to the case of a dead man who committed suicide by train. Or did he? Tate soon realises things aren’t so straightforward, as murder was the cause of death and the dead guy was also a bad guy, a convicted rapist whose last victim is still living in fear.   When more bad guys end up dead, he realises someone is helping rape victim’s exact revenge on their attackers.

Carl Schroder is the other ‘Coma Cop’ and life is not treating him well.  The bullet lodged in his head from a shooting six months ago hasn’t killed him but, almost as deadly, it’s switched off his emotions. Running across a recently paroled rapist he put away years ago, he follows him stalking the victim who put him in prison. After   saving her, he remembers a common plea cops get from the loved ones of victims – when you find the man who did this, give me five minutes alone with him. And finds a new mission.

Wow, this was my first book by Paul Cleave and am now hunting down the rest. You don’t need to have read previous novels to know what’s going on; just enough information is given to make the scene clear. The plot was tightly woven; leaving me breathless after each chapter, convinced death was looming only to have events snatch life back repeatedly. It must be hard, tracking   down a vigilante most people are cheering for! The dangers of vigilantism are also shown.   A well written book that makes you think.

Penguin Books

Supplied by 247 PR

Reviewed by Jan

If I Should Die

Territorial Army veteran Joseph Stark was badly wounded in an attack in Afghanistan that killed the rest of his unit. Returned to the normality of civilian life, he’s a Trainee Detective in Greenwich and does his best to ignore his army past, which is difficult when they keep calling. Seriously injured, Stark relies on painkillers and booze to keep him going but has consented to some hydrotherapy, where his therapist is an extremely attractive blonde.

A string of random attacks on the homeless occurs and the investigation soon links them to a gang of wanabe thugs. Even with CCTV and cell phone videos the police can’t prove anything though, and then one victim dies and it becomes a murder investigation. Then there’s another attack but this time the victim fights back…..

The storytelling is so vivid, the characters are so real, you can’t help but be drawn in. The plot is very strong and leads you to think one thing before suddenly – boom – you’re totally mistaken. This book is so well written and compelling, a fantastic debut novel that I could not put down. I am really looking forward to the next book!

Michael Joseph

Supplied by Penguin Random House New Zealand

Reviewed by Jan

the slaughter man

HE’S BACK!!!

A wealthy family has just been gruesomely executed inside their exclusive gated community, their youngest child abducted. Detective Max Wolfe is assigned the job of hunting down the killer and bringing him to justice, aided by his homicide team. Quickly forming a theory that the family was targeted because they were too perfect, they are stunned when the crime’s M.O. matches one of 30 years ago. Could the killer be the same man?

The Slaughter Man had done his time and is now old and dying though. Could he really be back killing families? Could this be a macabre tribute by a copycat killer – or a contract hit that is intended to frame a dying man?

Then another boy disappears……

Again, I couldn’t put this book down and was a zombie the next day due to lack of sleep.   The story was told in three parts and the plot was fast paced and very very clever. Full of twists and turns, most of which I didn’t see coming, despite being a crime novel devotee. The ending was satisfying and wrapped things up nicely. Max needs to change jobs if he plans to keep his promise to Scout though.

Read it, the series is excellent but you don’t need to have read the first to get lost in this.

Century

Supplied by Penguin Random House New Zealand

Reviewed by Jan

Read my review of The Murder Bag here

bones never lie

Now, I enjoy the “Bones” TV series, so it stands to reason that I’d like the latest book in Kathy Reichs’ series of books featuring the forensic anthropologist, Tempe Brennan, and I did, but not for the reasons you might think. For one thing, it became quite obvious early on that the TV series and the book series have evolved in very different directions. These are not the novelisations of the TV programme, and the TV series is so loosely based on the books that Tempe Brennan can watch Bones on TV and be amused. There are major aspects of the book series that aren’t even touched on TV, like the Canadian connection. And of course the characters are different.

“Bones never Lie” is the story of a cold case, of a serial killer of young girls, and of how Tempe Brennan tracks down that murderer. Now, I must admit that I did accurately guess whodunit about half way through the novel, and I’m not sure if that’s a good thing or not… Is it a sign that the author has dropped one too many breadcrumbs for the reader? Or is it deliberate? But that does not take away from the intense sense of verisimilitude one gets reading this novel. You see, Kathy Reichs is herself a forensic anthropologist, and is insistent on getting the science right. Which is something I appreciate. This is not science fiction, but it is fiction about science, and that works for me.

Heinemann

Supplied by Random House New Zealand

Reviewed by Jacqui

borderline

Annika Bengtzon is a journalist at Sweden’s second largest evening newspaper. Her husband is a mid-level bureaucrat at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. She is investigating violent deaths in Stockholm for news pieces that fit between the diet stories, celebratory gossip and sport articles that make up the staple of evening news. He is attending a conference of much worthiness but little importance in Kenya. Then he gets kidnapped and her life is turned on its head.

I am a newcomer to the Liza Marklund’s works and didn’t know whether to expert a police procedural mystery, as seems to be the norm these days or Swedish authors, or something else. I got something else.

Borderline is a tale of what happens when the journalist becomes part of the news story. When the journalistic ethic of dispassionate reporting is no longer possible for the journalist at the centre of the story. The plot is simple, but the story is Annika’s journey from confident woman one minute to desperate spouse the next to the slow climb back to confidence. In the background there was a murder mystery. But that was a mere piece of trivia for Annika, like the weight of a $1 million dollars in $20 bills.

I’m still unsure if I liked it or not.

Corgi

Supplied by Random House New Zealand

Reviewed by Simon