Archive for the ‘graphic novel’ Category

In this exciting sci fi graphic novel, Helen is kidnapped by time-travelling ninjas and finds herself in the year 2355. Humankind has been enslaved by giant ‘Peace Balls’ – and Helen holds the keys to their destruction . . .

Kidnapped by time-travelling ninjas, Helen is thrust into the year 2355 — a ruined future with roving gangs and ‘Peace Balls’, giant humming devices that enslave and control people’s minds.

The Go-Go Ninjas have one goal — to destroy the Peace Balls. They believe that Helen knows how.

Can Helen use her knowledge of the past to help them save the future?

An electrifying graphic novel by award-winning authors.

Helen and the GoGo Ninjas

Ant Sang and Michael Bennett

Illustrations by Ant Sang

Penguin

Supplied by Penguin Random House New Zealand

Reviewed by Dylan Howell

‘’Helen and the gogo ninjas’ is a 2018 graphic novel by co-authors Ant Sang and Michael Bennett. This novel tells a zany time-travel adventure with a crazy dystopian future and a dark truth about what price peace comes with.

Kidnapped by time-travelling ‘go-go ninjas’, Helen is brought to the year 2355 where she discovers that mankind has been enslaved by floating ‘peace-balls’ and these ninjas believe that she knows how to save the world.

I enjoyed this graphic novel. As an avid comic book fan I don’t always get the opportunity to enjoy an illustrated text that has a fresh idea. I can safely say I have never read a book like this. How often do you have an apocalyptic, time-travel action novel? Even though it was a short read, it provided a compelling story with excellent drawings with vivid and distinct images that leave a lot to the imagination. The story moved quickly but gave enough dialogue to keep me completely in time with the events in the story. There was not a moment when I was confused.

I would recommend this as a light read or to help a child get interested in reading. I certainly enjoyed it, however I would consider the age of a potential reader  as at points the action can get mildly violent or grim. So if you aren’t comfortable with blood and the idea of dismemberment or slavery, this may not be the book for you.  Read this book with caution.

That being said, I went back to read this book several times, the story and pacing was so light it was easy to pick up, but seemingly impossible to put down because the events happen so fluidly.

Dylan Howell

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The incredible story of Lyra Belacqua will begin in La Belle Sauvage – the first volume of The Book of Dust. Now you have the opportunity to revisit her adventures in Northern Lights, with this graphic novel adaptation of a masterpiece, which comes to life with incredible full-colour art. Follow Lyra’s story once again in a way you’ve never experienced it before, as the arrival of her fearsome uncle, Lord Asriel, draws her to the heart of a terrible struggle – a struggle born of Gobblers and stolen children, witch clans and armoured bears. Lyra hurtles toward danger in the cold far North, never suspecting the shocking truth, that she alone is destined to win, or to lose, this more-than-mortal battle. This edition combines all three illustrated volumes of the story, now available for the very first time in hardback.

Northern Lights – The Graphic Novel

Philip Pullman

adapted by Stéphane Melchior, art by Clément Oubrerie, translated by Anne Eaton

Doubleday

Supplied by Penguin Random House New Zealand

Reviewed by Steve

The publication of Philip Pullman’s Northern Lights as a graphic novel was inevitable. The book had been published in several languages as well as being made into a film. Surprisingly, the graphic novel was initially French and required retranslation back into English. For those who are wondering why retranslate and not just slip Pullman’s dialogue into the speech bubbles – don’t go there. It’s the arcane worlds of publishing and translation.

To answer the obvious questions, it sticks to the story and to story order. The original 450 pages have been reduced to 280. Considering “a picture is worth a thousand words”, this isn’t a reduction in length and points to the eloquent sparsity of Pullman’s work. It had been quite a while since I read Northern Lights (or watched The Golden Compass), that re-reading the graphic novel wasn’t a chore.

Perhaps the most important aspect of a graphic novel is the artwork, and Clément Oubrerie has done an excellent job. The style is suggestive of drawings by early teens, as opposed to the hyperclean comics of DC and Marvel. The colours are subdued, like those of a Northern Europe autumn. Mercifully, he has eschewed the bright ink of Asterix and Lucky Luke for dull pencil. Melchior has kept the dialogue balloons small and ownership obvious.

While the original version of this story was the text novel, this graphic novel was as satisfying. Plus it is encouraging me to try the French version. Definitely worthwhile.

The publication of Philip Pullman’s Northern Lights as a graphic novel was inevitable. The book had been published in several languages as well as being made into a film. Surprisingly, the graphic novel was initially French and required retranslation back into English. For those who are wondering why retranslate and not just slip Pullman’s dialogue into the speech bubbles – don’t go there. It’s the arcane worlds of publishing and translation.

To answer the obvious questions, it sticks to the story and to story order. The original 450 pages have been reduced to 280. Considering “a picture is worth a thousand words”, this isn’t a reduction in length and points to the eloquent sparsity of Pullman’s work. It had been quite a while since I read Northern Lights (or watched The Golden Compass), that re-reading the graphic novel wasn’t a chore.

Perhaps the most important aspect of a graphic novel is the artwork, and Clément Oubrerie has done an excellent job. The style is suggestive of drawings by early teens, as opposed to the hyperclean comics of DC and Marvel. The colours are subdued, like those of a Northern Europe autumn. Mercifully, he has eschewed the bright ink of Asterix and Lucky Luke for dull pencil. Melchior has kept the dialogue balloons small and ownership obvious.

While the original version of this story was the text novel, this graphic novel was as satisfying. Plus it is encouraging me to try the French version. Definitely worthwhile.