Posts Tagged ‘simon holst’

There’s nothing like a hearty soup to provide a nourishing midwinter meal.

This comprehensive cookbook contains every imaginable soup from Simon and Alison Holst’s extensive collection of tried-and-true recipes, with some ‘new favourites’ added for good measure.

Hyndman

Supplied by Hyndman NZ

Reviewed by Jacqui

It is exactly what it says on the tin, one hundred recipes for different soups from the Holsts. Only not from the tin, because the objective here is to make your soup from scratch. Some recipes are surprising quick to create, such as the Quick Pumpkin Soup, with just ten minutes cooking time. Others, like Granny’s Chicken Soup, involve hours of gentle simmering, turning a tough old bird into something delicious… There are some great ideas here, like the Nearly Instant Stocks. Although I was a little disappointed to find that my favourite Mulligatawny Soup is missing, there is a very nice Chicken Laksa. So, plenty of recipes and a good range. If you need to feed a crowd cheaply and nutritiously, there’s plenty to work with. And I’m told enjoying soup is so filling that it helps with losing weight.

I showed this book to one friend, and it disappeared for a week because she wanted to try one of the recipes, which must surely count as a second recommendation.

 

 

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Hyndman

Supplied by Hyndman New  Zealand

Reviewed by Jacqui

This is another remarkably useful little recipe book from the Holsts, in the “Everyday Easy” series, this time focusing on home-made sweets. They start with a proper kiwi recipe for salted caramels using condensed milk and golden syrup (instead of the undesirable corn syrup you’ll find in most). Really must give this a go!

There are several recipes for different types of fudge, then marshmallows, toffees, rocky road, chocolate crackles, lolly cake and lots of different kinds of sweet truffles. There are even lunchbox treats like “birdseed bars” which I will have to try (I like to make these things in paper muffin cases). I can safely guarantee that this book will come out and see a lot of use when it is time to make the Christmas treats.

The hidden advantage of a good book of home-made sweet recipes is that you know exactly what goes into them. Bought sweets, especially the cheap ones, are full of mystery ingredients that you’re better off without. My only complaint is to the publisher; the high cover price for such a slim volume is liable to put off many potential purchasers. But that’s a small quibble over another excellent collection.

meals-for-1-or-2

I’m finding this to be a remarkably useful little cookbook, for all its slim size and unpretentious design. These are real recipes for real food that an ordinary person would actually cook. It’s the kind of book you could give a teenager leaving home to go flatting, and know that they’ll be able to make themselves something to eat that will be cheaper and healthier than a takeaway. None of that upmarket middle-class trendy food here. Just proper New Zealand grub.

I’ve already tried several recipes (and many others were already kitchen standards – I know how to scramble eggs, but I’m happy to see recipes like that in the context of a book for inexperienced cooks). The sausage-meat squares made an excellent dinner, and though the salmon cakes were a little dry, that was probably my fault. But it’s good to see cheap and easy store-cupboard recipes like this. For example, instead of calling for vast quantities of expensive maple syrup just to make a cake, the Holsts explain how to create a passable imitation, to go with their French toast.

Most of the recipes are for two servings, but there are lots of suggestions and variations, and many of these dishes can be easily reheated, so one for now and one for later.

(I interrupt this review for an experiment in progress: my teenager desired something to go with his ice cream for dessert, and I suggested the 5-minute chocolate mug cake. He’s giving it a go. It makes two, so there will one for him, and one for me to share with my husband. It’s definitely taking more than five minutes, but that would be down to finding the ingredients, and inexperience. The result: “Looks a bit funny…. Tastes pretty fine, actually.” I’ll call that a success, and it was indeed very nice with salted caramel ice cream.)

So, I’d call this an excellent choice for novice cooks, especially if they’re on a budget. It’s a great book for the student, in more ways than one.

Hyndman

Supplied by Hyndman New Zealand

Reviewed by Jacqui

the-complete-home-baking-collection

This is a selection of over 250 recipes from the Holsts’ extensive library and amounts to a substantial collection of recipes for home baking with a kiwi flavour. Most of your favourites will be here. There plenty of excellent ideas for cakes, slices and muffins, but for me there are not quite enough biscuit recipes.  ANZAC biscuits and Kiwi biscuits are included, but sadly there are no Afghans or jammy dodgers.

So, perhaps not quite complete enough for me. There are still plenty of new things for me to experiment with. Two different rhubarb cakes for starters.

These are reliable recipes, tried and tested, and I have every expectation that they will succeed. There is even a gluten-free section, which looks to be a whole lot better than that found in most gluten-free cookbooks. There’s no cheating and using “gluten-free flour”. Instead each recipe has its own flour mix, generally involving rice and tapioca flours, especially designed for that application.

You only need to read through this part of the book to see how much care and attention has gone into making sure it all works. And I think one can safely assume that that same effort has gone into the rest of the recipes. Good stuff, and an inspiration to get people baking at home.

Definitely, this is a book that would be welcome in many a kiwi kitchen (and by those who like eating the resulting home-baked goodies)!

Published by Hyndman

Supplied by Hyndman New Zealand

Reviewed by Jacqui

 Simply Delicious One Dish Recipes

A wide collection of yummy meals that are easy to prepare, the recipes are divided into neat sections with soup, salads, sweets, side dishes, and methods of cooking – frypan, casserole dish, or slow cooker. As few ingrediants have been used as possible, generally the basics every pantry has. A table is supplied that lists all the ingredients used, which is useful as you’re not stuck searching for them at the last minute.

Great for busy people who don’t have or don’t want to spend much time in the kitchen, as while some recipes take a longer cooking time they’re all simple and don’t need a lot of prep time. I don’t enjoy cooking but have managed to make some dishes featured in the book and thanks to the idiot-proof instructions, they turned out delicious!

Hyndman has generously supplied me with three copies to give away. Comment on this blog post by Sunday 7th December and I’ll put you in the draw.  Open to NZ addresses only.

Hyndman

Supplied by Hyndman

Reviewed by Jan

quick mealsThis is a handy little book for those who lead busy lives and don’t have the time or energy to cook elaborate meals.  There is a handy list of pantry essentials and Simon has used these core ingredients throughout the book.  The recipes are in weekly blocks and you can use this menu plan to plan ahead and make shopping easier.  Of course, you can create your own weekly plan by arranging recipes in a way to suit you.

Included are hits and variations you can try on the basic recipe.  These are ways to add flavour and sometimes give a recipe a whole new twist.  Simon has included tips that remind you to think ahead and save some time when cooking.  Also listed are recipes for side dishes like potato wedges, salad dressing, and coleslaw and tips on how to cook rice.  Easy to follow and informative, this  is a handy guide for when you come home after a long day and want something quick and easy to make that tastes yummy.

Hyndman Publishers has kindly supplied two copies of this cookbook for giveaways.  To be in the draw leave a comment below and winners will be drawn on Thursday 7 October.  Open to those in New Zealand and Australia only.

Hyndman Publishers

Supplied by Hyndman Publishers

Reviewed by Jan