Posts Tagged ‘satima flavell’

daggersaQueen Ellyria just wants her sick triplet sons to live, each ruling over a third of the kingdom as their dying father wished. When she finds herself trapped in a deadly bargain with a Dark Spirit, she recruits a band of young mages to help – but a terrible curse takes over.
The Dark Spirit befriends her enemies and seduces her friends, and Ellyria soon finds that famine, pestilence, betrayal and bereavement are all in its arsenal.
Can Ellyria unite the elvish and mortal sides of her family and in so doing, save the kingdom?

“Crisp, stylish prose, a nicely realised medieval world and an undercurrent of dark magic make The Dagger of Dresnia a good read for lovers of epic fantasy. It’s refreshing to see an older female character on centre stage!”
– Juliet Marillier Author of the Sevenwaters series
“A classic story for lovers of traditional fantasy. Readers who love the gradual unfolding of a story and the development of relationships as much as action scenes will enjoy this one.”
– Glenda Larke Author of The Mirage Makers trilogy

BARNES & NOBLE ~~ AMAZON

Do you plan everything or just let the story flow?

I’m sort of in between! When a story decides to invade my mind, it gives me two things only – a character and a situation. The character, strangely, comes with his or her CV, diary and birth certificate. In other words, I know a lot about that character right from the start – his or her name, age, family background, occupation or social class, and circumstances at the start of the novel. I ask the character what s/he wants, and usually I find out straight away or within a day or two. So I have my MC, a beginning and an end. The rest I have pick up on the fly.

Do your characters ever want to take over the story?

Yes, they do take over to a very large degree, but sometimes I have to be strict with them or they will bring along all their friends and relations. I often end up with far too many characters even when I don’t give the main ones free license to drag in their brothers or long-lost cousins!

Are you a morning person or a night owl?

I write best in the mornings, but if I’m on a roll I can keep going all day and into the night. Yet just as often, I have to make myself write or at least draft the next scene.

Where do you dream of travelling to and why?

I would love to tour Europe.

Do distant places feature in your books?

Yes indeed! My stories invariably have historic settings in an imaginary world that looks very much like medieval Europe, although I do have a yen for England in the times from Elizabeth I to Charles II, too. Having grown up in Australia I feel somewhat deprived of my historical roots and I think my writing reflects that.

Do you listen to music while writing?

Occasionally, and my choice of listening invariably reflects the two historical periods mentioned above. Composers from Dowland to Purcell are pretty standard listening, together with early music such as Gregorian chant.

What previous works have you released?

The Dagger of Dresnia is my first published novel, and it’s the first book of a trilogy. I’ve had the odd poem and short story published before, starting with ‘Dolly’s Lullaby’ in The Manchester Guardian’s children’s feature when I was seven. Sadly, (or perhaps thankfully) none of my juvenilia is still in print! You can find a story of mine in the anthology Mythic Resonance by Stephen Thompson (ed) which I think is still available via Amazon, and a sonnet in the collection The Weighing of the Heart, published by Sunline Press. http://www.sunlinepress.com.au/sunline/

Could you tell us a bit about your latest release?

The Dagger of Dresnia is a medieval fantasy, complete with elves and the odd dragon. It’s about a widowed queen who has triplet sons, and in trying to ensure they have peaceful, prosperous reigns she is tricked into making a rash promise to a Dark Spirit. Mayhem ensues, but so does romance and adventure.

What have you learned about writing and publishing since you first started?

I made a point of learning as much as I could by visiting blogs by writers and editors and scouring publishers’ websites. I would impress on beginning authors that this is essential – learn as much about the industry as you can. I was already a professional non-fiction editor, but fiction editing is different world!

Is there anything you would do differently?

I would have started earlier if I could. Starting a novelist’s career after the normal age of retirement is a tad eccentric. However, I was well into my fifties before inspiration for fiction came to visit, even though I’ve been a voracious reader of fantasy ever since I was a child.

Who, or what, if anything has influenced your writing?

In a nutshell: history, other writers, my own life, and the lives of others.

Anything you would say to those just starting out in the craft?

Learn as much as you can by going to classes and workshops, especially in your chosen genre. And never stop reading!

What are three words that describe you?

Old, eccentric and intelligent. Every day, I work on becoming more compassionate. It’s the one quality, I think, that might save the world, and it’s in very short supply.

What’s your favourite book?

Possibly Mary Stewart’s The Crystal Cave, or Juliet Marillier’s Wildwood Dancing, but I love too many authors to have a fixed favourite.

What is your favourite food?

Fresh garden salad!

Marmite or vegemite?

Being an Aussie with papers to prove it I’ll say Vegemite, but to be honest I don’t think there’s much to choose between them!

Have you got a blurb of your book?

Yup – here it is straight from the back cover: Queen Ellyria just wants her sick triplet sons to live, each ruling over a third of the kingdom as their dying father wished. When she finds herself trapped in a deadly bargain with a Dark Spirit, she recruits a band of young mages to help – but a terrible curse takes over.
The Dark Spirit befriends her enemies and seduces her friends, and Ellyria soon finds that famine, pestilence, betrayal and bereavement are all in its arsenal.
Can Ellyria unite the elvish and mortal sides of her family and in so doing, save the kingdom?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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Satima Flavell is a freelance writer, editor and reviewer. She has already published poems and short stories as well as many feature articles and reviews – her work as an arts journalist has appeared in The Australian, The West Australian, Music Maker, Dance Australia and many other journals. Her first novel, The Dagger of Dresnia, book one of The Talismans Trilogy, has just been released by Melbourne’s Satalyte Publishing.

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