Review of My First Words in Maori – Stacey Morrison

Posted: September 3, 2019 in nonfiction
Tags: , ,

Help your tamariki to korero Maori with this brilliant first words book by Stacey Morrison, gorgeously illustrated by Ali Teo and John O’Reilly.
My First Words in Maori equips your whanau with the first words you need to speak te reo at home together.

With lively pictures labelled in Maori and English, each page introduces the concepts and words children use as they first begin to talk, get to know people and explore the world around them.

Designed by Maori language champion and broadcaster Stacey Morrison for parents and tamariki to read together, with plenty of details in the illustrations to point out and name, scenes include: Taku Tinana/My Body, Taku Whanau/My Family, Taku Whare/My House, Wahi Takaro/At the Park, Tatahi/At the Beach, Te Marae / The Marae – and much more!

This is the perfect book to bring the Maori language into your home and have fun with the kids on their language journey.

My First Words in Maori

Stacey Morrison, illustrated by Ali Teo & John O’Reilly

Puffin

Supplied by Penguin Random House New Zealand

Reviewed by Jan Butterworth

This book features words that will be useful to any child learning to talk, as well as phrases that will help in conversing in Maori.

Each double page features a subject – Pets/Mokai, Clothes/Kakahu, Emotions/Kare a-roto, or House/Whare – and is attractively illustrated with a colourful array of items that relate to it – Cat/Ngeru, Dress/Panekoti, Lonely/Mokemoke, or Ipad/Ipapa.  It was good to see the
Food/Kai page featured Marmite/Ihipani – a Kiwi staple!

The phrases are basic little sentences to encourage talking – The rabbit is jumping!/Kei te pekepeke te rapeti!, Where are your clothes?/Kei te makariri koe?, How are you?/Kei te pehea koe?, or Our house!/To tatou whare!  There’s a great map of New Zealand listing place names so you can say where you’re from.  The back has a basic list of numbers, colours, and shapes.  Stacey Morrison explains in the prologue that some English words have more than one translation in te reo so she used the most common Maori word.

This is an awesome resource that will be invaluable to families learning to speak te reo.

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