Review of Monsters – Sharon Dogar

Posted: April 22, 2019 in general fiction, history, Review
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1814: Mary Godwin, the sixteen-year-old daughter of radical socialist and feminist writers, runs away with a dangerously charming young poet – Percy Bysshe Shelley. From there, the two young lovers travel a Europe in the throes of revolutionary change, through high and low society, tragedy and passion, where they will be drawn into the orbit of the mad and bad Lord Byron.
But Mary and Percy are not alone: they bring Jane, Mary’s young step-sister. And she knows the biggest secrets of them all . . .

Told from Mary and Jane’s perspectives, Monsters is a novel about radical ideas, rule-breaking love, dangerous Romantics, and the creation of the greatest Gothic novel of them all: Frankenstein.

Monsters

Sharon Dogar

Andersen

Supplied by Penguin Random House New Zealand

Reviewed by Piper Mejia

Despite analysis by PhD students of Literature it is impossible to say why a novel becomes a classic. Frankenstein, written by Mary Shelley when she was just a teenager, has remained a constant ‘must read’ since its publication on New Year’s Day 1818. Since then, one reader after another has picked up Frankenstein to see ourselves in Mary’s characters, both the creator and the created; the one who harms and the one who is harmed. As we read, we question how its author was able to convey our own struggle through life through an impossible metaphor of monster. In Monsters, Sharon Dogar attempts to give us a peek into the events in Mary’s own life that allowed her to write the novel of a lifetime.

Monsters follow the life of Mary Shelley from 14 until the publication of her novel, Frankenstein at 19 years old.  Throughout the novel, her obsession for understanding her dead mother becomes an obsession for a married man and his ideas of modern society, and finally an obsession for her own novel. As she writes, Mary becomes convinced that the terrible events she brings alive on the page cause them spill over into the real world with deadly consequences.

Sharon Dogar’s historical novel allows the reader into the world in which Frankenstein was created. We not only get to understand Mary’s life, her family and her friends, but we also get a greater understanding of the societal shifts around the western world as equality for workers and women were becoming centre stage. At its core, it is a novel about an unhappy little girl finding love and a sense of self-worth; and around the edges are a study of people and places we have read about but never experienced.

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