Review of The Massacre of Mankind: Authorised Sequel to The War of the Worlds – Stephen Baxter

Posted: August 29, 2017 in blog tour, Review, science fiction
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It has been 14 years since the Martians invaded England. The world has moved on, always watching the skies but content that we know how to defeat the Martian menace. Machinery looted from the abandoned capsules and war-machines has led to technological leaps forward. The Martians are vulnerable to earth germs. The Army is prepared.

So when the signs of launches on Mars are seen, there seems little reason to worry. Unless you listen to one man, Walter Jenkins, the narrator of Wells’ book. He is sure that the Martians have learned, adapted, understood their defeat.

He is right.

Thrust into the chaos of a new invasion, a journalist – sister-in-law to Walter Jenkins – must survive, escape and report on the war.

The Massacre of Mankind has begun

 Gollancz

Supplied by Hatchette New Zealand

Reviewed by Steve

It’s 1920, 13 years after the Martian invasion Walter Jenkins described in The War of the Worlds, and Julie Elphinstone, Jenkins ex-sister in law, is working as a journalist in New York. But the world, or rather Europe, is not at peace. And the Martians signal their intent to invade again. Jenkins has read the signs and drawn his acquaintances back into maelstrom that an interplanetary war will be. This time it will span more than just Britain.

Stephen Baxter was authorised by the estate of HG Wells to write this sequel, and his choice of a new narrator was a bold but logical choice. Jenkins, after his contacts with the Martians was a bit of a broken reed. Julie, his sister in law, would’ve been well placed to spot his character flaws, and Baxter plays them beautifully. He also shows a side of Albert cook that would be a logical progression from that character’s interactions with the Martians.

The story is told in four parts, basically as the calamity unfolds, with obvious lulls in the action; war is not a constant assault but more a series of breathers interspersed with furious action. Interested parties abound. As before, the Martians seem unstoppable. Like wells, Baxter resorts to Deus ex Machina, which is both more and less satisfying than the original. How the Martians developed resistance to Terran pathogens is not adequately explained, especially as they had no samples to work with. And my gut feeling is that the UK would have moved heaven and earth to either prevent a European war or have one fought on its terms.

Baxter has done a good job in both creating and recreating the characters. What flaws there are can be mostly blamed on Lowell’s theories being truly out of date: Venerians indeed. I liked the story and its female narrator and recommend this to anybody who is a fan of HG Wells.

 

 

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