Bread Revolution: Rise Up & Bake – Duncan Glendinning & Patrick Ryan

Posted: March 16, 2013 in cookbook, Review
Tags:

rise up and bakeI own a lot of cookery books, including half a dozen specifically about baking bread, so it takes a bit of persuasion to get me to shell out real money for a bread cookery book, but this one won me over with its friendly presentation, and just as importantly, a couple of recipes that really caught my eye. There was a ham hock terrine that looked like a great way to use up a hock from the freezer in summer (it goes with a crusty baguette). And there was a new method for sour dough bread that I thought might be worth trying.

It wasn’t until I got it home and started reading that I realised something that would have made my mind up even quicker. I got to “Local Cheese Loaf” and read the introduction “With our bakery just a few miles from Cheddar…” A bit of searching on the internet, and I found that the “Thoughtful Bread Company” is based in the village of Farrington Gurney, just a handful of miles from my childhood home village of Rode, near Bath in England. I was so glad I’d bought their book. Just to look at the pictures (there are plenty of them, and they’re not just of food) is to bring back memories.

But that is, of course, no recommendation for the rest of the world. No, what commends this book is its excellent selection of bread recipes, old and new, written in a clear, modern, and easy to follow style, with tempting photos and recipes for things to serve with the bread. For example, the “Crunchy Cracker Bread” – a great way to use up that leftover lump of pizza dough – comes with a selection of dips to try. I made that cracker bread and it vanished…

This is a bread book that makes you want to bake. It begins by explaining how to get started in bread making with exhaustive instructions (including pictures) for an “Everyday White Bread”. It goes on to share the secrets of “Tiger Bread”, “Rye Crackers” and “Sourdough” among lots of others. Many recipes come with suggested variations – like the “Chocolate Brioche Buns” and the “Focaccia of 1000 Toppings”.  Finally there is a selection of recipes for “Crust-2-Crust Eating” and they’re so right, you should never have to buy breadcrumbs. It’s all good, and I’m very glad this book found me. (Oh, and as an added bonus, the authors are the professional bakers featured in “The Big Bread Experiment” which recently screened on Food TV).

Murdoch Books

Purchased from Book Clearance, Onehunga

Reviewed by Jacqui

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s